Changing the Viewing Window

You can change the viewing window to better fit the data you're looking at. For making easy adjustments while accessing Desmos in the browser, you can use the plus and minus signs to zoom in and out, respectively, on the coordinate plane. You can also use the house icon to go back to the default viewing window which is pre-defined depending on the screen size.

 

   

To zoom in and out on mobile devices, you can pinch the screen. It's also possible, only on mobile, to zoom in and out on a single axes by touching two fingers to the axis and pinching.

  

For more extensive data, you may find it easier to manually adjust the domain and range of the viewport. To do so, click on the wrench to open the Graph Settings menu and choose which axis you'd like to adjust.

 

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16 Comments

  • 5
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    Scott Kreidler

    Have you considered adding single-axis zoom functionality to the website?

    Currently in Chrome, in addition to the buttons explained above, a mouse scroll wheel will zoom in and out around the position of the mouse pointer. However, being able to do a single-axis zoom (with clickable buttons and/or scroll wheel) would be very helpful with certain asymmetrical graphs.

    Perhaps the + and - buttons could have a hover popout that offers x-only and y-only zooming? Something like this, maybe?

    As for mouse zooming, perhaps an Alt- or Ctrl- or Shift-scrollwheel for the one-axis zooming?

    Thanks!

    -Scott

  • 0
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    Curtis Rey

    What Scott said.  Single axis zoom in Chrome would be awesome!

  • 0
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    Dave Zimmer

    Being able to change the aspect ratio quickly, easily, visually is something that I miss here. I use Desmos extensively in my math classes, and it's kind of a drag to have to manually type in new numbers for x and y limits to view a graph over a large domain/range. I love Scott's idea. I was thinking maybe a location sensitive area on the screen, for example a small square a few pixels wide over the x/y axis labels where a mouse point and wheel zoom would zoom only one axis in or out.

  • 0
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    Matt Miller

    Ditto what Scott said.  As a long-time Sketchpad user, I have been missing this feature as I make the transition to Desmos.  However, I think I've stumbled across a workaround for this. Go to the graph settings and click on either the upper or lower limit of the axis you want to remain unchanged (the underline of that limit will change to blue).  While that is selected, point at the graph (but don't click the mouse button) and scroll in and out as you would if you were zooming.  It's clunky, but it works for now. Hopefully Desmos will at the single-axis zoom functionality soon.

  • 0
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    Dave Zimmer

    Matt, this works great! To zoom in only the Y-axis, for example, I select any value for the X-axis, the min, max or step (they don't turn blue for me) then point (but don't click) in the graph area and scroll the mouse wheel. Bingo! My students are loving it too! When plotting data for science classes it's not unusual to have widely varying ranges and domains. Thanks bunches!

  • 0
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    Gregory Allen

    Is this still working? Like all of you, I was quite happy to see this functionality.  But it seems to have stopped working.  Is this the case?

  • 0
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    Dave Zimmer

    Sadly, it has stopped working. I thought maybe it was because I upgraded Firefox, but it doesn't work in Chrome either. As soon as you mouse over the graph area and scroll the mouse wheel, the settings menu disappears and normal zoom takes over. This behavior started a few weeks ago.

  • 1
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    Benny Lin

    I'm wondering if it's possible to zoom in and out in Desmos Geometry as well. It'd be way easier to make constructions without worrying about the arcs going out of the viewing window. 

  • 1
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    Dave Zimmer

    Yes, a zoom feature in ../Geometry would be nice also. It would make complex constructions easier by panning and zooming in to select just the right point for an intersection or endpoint. Then, zoom out to view the result.

  • 0
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    John Bennett

    The feature/bug where you could set the cursor in one of axes settings and scroll to adjust the other axis NEEDS to be returned, or at the very least, provide a way to zoom only one axis. I use functions quite often that I know the domain of, but the range. I often used this method to find the appropriate settings for the y-axis. Now that I have to zoom in and out with the same ratio aspect, it's hard to see the max/min values, because the graph has become so condensed in the horizontal direction it's almost impossible to see. Please bring back the ability to leave the settings box open while using the scroll wheel to adjust the graph.

     

  • 1
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    Morganbz

    if you have a touch screen laptop, you can hold a single axis with your two fingers, and it will let you zoom out or in on a single axis.

  • 1
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    John Bennett

    I accidentally discovered a way to zoom only one axis on the desktop version. Hold down the shift key and move the cursor near one of the axea. The cursor changes to either vertical or horizontal arrows, depending on which one you are near. The scroll now only rescales that axis. Great for finding the local extremes on polynomial graphs, erc.

  • 0
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    Dave Zimmer

    I've tried John's method in both Firefox and Chrome, but it's just not working for me. The shift key only turns the click into a drag and the appearance of the mouse cursor is not changing. I wonder, are you using a touch screen device that has a different behavior than a regular desktop/laptop?

  • 0
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    John Bennett

    That's curious Dave. I use Chrome, and I just double checked to make sure what I typed was what I was doing. Without holding the shift key, "click and drag" moves the axes in the way a horizontal or vertical shift would. But if I hold the shift key on the keyboard, the cursor changes to a double arrow. If I'm close to one of the axes, it points parallel to  that axis. If I'm not near an axis, it points diagonally and zooms the graph proportionally centered on the cursor.

    This is on a normal desktop, not a touchscreen. In testing again, I realized you don't have to use the scroll button, but once the shift key is down and the cursor has changed, if you "click and drag" in the direction of the arrows, it rescales only that direction. Also, the "capslock" did NOT work, only holding the shift key down manually. I have only tried Chrome, and maybe it is a browser version issue.

  • 0
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    Dave Zimmer

    Oh gosh... SHIFT key (not SPACE bar). I guess 8PM is too late in the evening for me to think straight. Amazing I can even spell!.

    Thanks John! this works FABULOUSLY!

    Desmos: If you could document this feature and keep it, a lot of us will be happy campers!!

  • 0
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    Dave Zimmer

    Happy Camper here... OK, WITHOUT holding Shift, scrolling the wheel zooms AROUND the point where the mouse cursor is located, and drag simply drags the whole graph like a translation.

    WHEN HOLDING SHIFT, Observe the direction of the double arrow mouse cursor: (this is amazing...) WHEN the cursor is a diagonal arrow: SCROLLING the wheel does the same thing as a normal zoom about the location of the cursor. DRAGGING zooms about the ORIGIN according to the relative distance change of the cursor location from the origin (took me a while to figure that out) maintaining the current aspect ratio. When the cursor is a horizontal or vertical double arrow (and still holding shift) SCROLLING zooms only that axis about the cursor location and DRAGGING zooms only that axis about the origin. This enables changing the aspect ratio.

    If you're trying to zoom the x-axis only and you have a horizontal arrow, and you're scrolling the wheel you may be zooming your graph off the screen. Moving the cursor closer to the y-axis may cause the cursor to change to a vertical arrow. So, instead of scrolling the wheel, just drag and it zooms the origin. Ingenious!

    I'm sure there's a more straight forward way to document this but I'm so excited to learn this I can't contain myself! Like everything else in Desmos, play with it for about 60 seconds and it becomes obvious!

    Thanks again, Team Desmos!!

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