Shading Your Graph

You can use inequalities and restrictions to shade your graph, like this: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/mvcuf0mirs

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46 Comments

  • 1
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    Mollie Cameron

    Is there a way to isolate the intersection of several inequality graphs?

  • -2
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    Team Desmos

    Hi Mollie - here are two different ways to restrict a shaded region: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/naygdmnh7x

  • 1
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    Rob Byrne

    Is there an easy way to shade between two circles? I have been trying for a while, but still can't figure it out.

  • 0
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    Team Desmos

    Hi Rob, It's a bit tricky! Try something like this: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/9rnklphdpu

  • 1
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    17mmcinnis

    What about shading in a diamond that I made? I would prefer it if it was all the same shade of a color.

  • 4
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    Shenning

    For linear programming, there could be four or five overlapping regions. It would be nice if there is a toggle to set to shade ONLY where all inequalities are true. Then the feasible region would be the only area shaded. This would make it more clear for many students. Thanks!

  • 1
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    Connormcc9719

    I am trying to shade in between a vertical line a part of an upside down parabola. Changing first part of parabola to f(x) works fine but changing first part of x\le -5\left\{8<y<9\right\} did copy right.. to g(x)\le -5\left\{8<y<9\right\}  it wont work

  • 1
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    Pamela Hundley

    Edited by Pamela Hundley
  • 1
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    21kd63964

    I am trying to shade the Adidas Sign, a staff pick on your website, and I can't figure out how to. Do you think you could help me so I don't have to redo everything? Thanks. 

    Edited by 21kd63964
  • 1
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    Per H. Christiansen

    For shading with different colour depths one could try this method:

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/ee0fwcvqsn 

  • 1
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    Ahaberfawcet

    I have a graph of an ellipse with an overlapping circle. I am trying to figure out how to only shade the part of the ellipse that the circle is not covering. Anyone know how to do this?

  • 1
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    Per H. Christiansen
    Edited by Per H. Christiansen
  • 2
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    Edward Niemann

    I am trying to make a triangle and fill it in with an inequality. How would I only shade what is in the triangle and nothing else? Any help would be much appreciated. https://www.desmos.com/calculator/8xkaihding

  • 1
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    Per H. Christiansen

    Try experimenting with this triangle. You can start dragging point (x2, y2) downwards.

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/wkugvln0kh

    Then try increasing colour depth to 10 in this case:

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/48jkd8aus5

    Edited by Per H. Christiansen
  • 1
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    Edward Niemann

    Thanks

  • 1
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    Per H. Christiansen

    You're welcome.

  • 1
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    Edward Niemann

    Where would I ask questions that do not specifically have an article devoted to that topic? Where would I ask questions about rotating shapes?

  • 1
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    Per H. Christiansen

    I do not know. But I have improved the coloured triangle:

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/107cto9wgr

    When it comes to rotation, you might take a look at this one:

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/6gvv3f4jlp

    Edited by Per H. Christiansen
  • 1
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    Edward Niemann

    Thank you. I figured out my problem with rotating shapes shortly after I asked that question.

  • -3
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    Michael Fenton

    Edward, you can always email general questions to us at calculator@desmos.com.

  • 2
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    17maiagarc

    Is there a way to only shade in 1 circle? I have been trying for a while and cannot quite get it!

  • 1
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    Michael Fenton

    17maiagarc, can you share a link to the graph you're working on?

  • -1
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    Edward Niemann

    How do you have to structure the inequality in this graph so that the triangle is completely shaded for any three points? By the triangle being shaded, I mean that there is no case when the inside of the triangle would not be completely shaded and that there is no case with anything outside of the triangle being shaded. I have it set to work for a specific case, but how would you change it to work in every case? Any help would be greatly appreciated

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/4pnvfszduf

  • -1
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    Rebekahhiggins

    Is there a way I can shade a parabola bound by a region that is connected to a circle and not overlap color on the circle? Is there a way to unshade a circle?

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/c5jymi1oy0

    Edited by Rebekahhiggins
  • -1
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    Ipearse

    Hi, I am trying to shade some of my parametric reflected-ellipse heart curve. No idea how to do this. Any help appreciated:

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/xjogbn7ni7

     

  • -1
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    Serge Ballif

    Ipearse, I have tried a lot of things to get parametric shading without much luck. For your particular problem you could try getting a non-parametric formula of a comparable heart such as:

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/xsc32wxh7f

  • -1
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    Safiya Light

    Rebekahhiggins, although it may be to late for your project I do have an answer to the question "Is there anyway to unshade a circle?" You can change how the circle appears by how you type the equation in.

    Here is my example: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/rsepnri4zk

    One thing I like about the second equation besides it not being filled in is that (in my opinion) it gives a better ability to control it's position on the graph. Hope it helps.

    Safiya Light

  • -1
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    Per H. Christiansen
    Edited by Per H. Christiansen
  • 0
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    19mnguyen8

    hi i was wondering if there is any way to shade in the butterflies on my graph it looks so plain without color. THANKS

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/ylzkgvyonn

     

  • 0
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    Serge Ballif

    Yes, you can shade in polar coordinates if you have solved explicitly for r. Don't use function notation or it will plot it like a cartesian function. For example, here is your shaded butterfly:

    https://www.desmos.com/calculator/lztrhhgdhh

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